Dorota & Steve Coy, and Adrian Wong @ Wasserman Projects

Wasserman Projects has extended its two spring exhibitions, Dorota & Steve Coy: The Five Realms and Adrian Wong: Tiles, Grates, Poles, Rocks, Plants, and Veggies, into summer 2020. Both exhibitions were slated to open to the public on March 13, but were closed just days prior in accordance with health and safety guidelines. The Five Realms features five distinct immersive installations that continue Detroit-based artists Dorota & Steve Coy’s examinations of the relationships between humanity, the natural world, and commodity, past, present, and into the future. Tiles, Grates, Poles, Rocks, Plants, and Veggies includes works from across 10 years of Chicago-based artist Adrian Wong’s practice, which together capture his engagement with the underlying conceptual ideas and historic contexts found within simple, everyday design elements. These exhibitions communicate with each other through an exploration of the commodification of resources that sustain life itself and the ones that make it worth existing at all.

Adrian Wong, Rock Stack I with Ferns, Foliage, 2020 Fiberglass, paint, artificial plants 66.5” x 63” x 40” All images are courtesy of Wasserman Projects.

This show’s narrative alternates between the two exhibitions beginning with Adrian Wong’s opening remarks on structure, pattern and a desire for beauty that attempts, through aggressive pursuit of the material, to quell personal insecurity but winds up unnatural and often flawed. In 1935, Mr. Aw, the inventor of the Tiger Balm Ointment, built a private residence adjoining a garden for public enjoyment. Noted for its spectacular assortment of Taoist, Confucian and Buddhist characters on display in a picturesque setting and a ferocious tiger seated on the brink of a cliff, [Tiger Balm Garden] captured the imagination of the older generation of Hong Kongese. Rock Stack I with Ferns, Foliage, 2020 is a riff on Mr. Aw’s artificially created garden using amplified color-charged ‘rocks’ and plastic foliage generating an unsettling vibe.

Adrian Wong, Untitled (Grates VIII/IX: Derrick Industrial Building / Shun Tak Ferry Terminal), 2014 MDF, latex, enamel, stainless steel, glass, neon 46” x 46” x 7”

Untitled (Grates VIII/IX: Derrick Industrial Building / Shun Tak Ferry Terminal) references both a demarcated public space and the Buddhist symbol of the eight spoked wheel, a symbol of both compartmentalized physical and psychological space. His grates explore seen and unseen social and cultural boundaries. Its geometry is a perfect visual transition to Dorota and Steve Coy’s adjacent mathematical sketches.

Dorota & Steve Coy, Metatron 2, 2020 Ink on Paper 16.75” x 17” (framed: 18.75” x 19”)

Dorota & Steve Coy, Spirit of the Forest, 2020 Cast aluminum, automotive enamel Unique edition of 7, 87” x 22” x 15”

From here the story moves into what looks like a mad scientist’s notes, ponderings, warnings. Dorota and Steve Coy have translated actual text into an imaginary language underscoring celestial maps, DNA strands and geometric equations that calculate and consider global catastrophes like warfare and disease through math and science. The Spirit of the Forest, a deer/human centaur-like statue, stands sentinel, beckons and tempts you to the next engagement. It’s antlers call to a lonely tree’s branches just inside a completely dark second realm. The mystery draws you around the corner to the shock and sadness of a single spotlight illuminating a golden melting rhinoceros. Looking deeply into its glass eye, its soul is present, pleading. The Black Forest’s menacing trees are right out of Grimm’s Fairy Tales, you’re half expecting them to move, taunt or maybe throw their apples in an effort to push you through. Nothing to see here . . . A perfect metaphor for corporate greed’s indiscriminate destruction of natural resources for the benefit of their bottom line.

Dorota & Steve Coy, Nature of Commodity, 2020 Fiberglass, resin, gold enamel 38” x 125” x 92”

Dorota & Steve Coy, The Deity, 2020 Fiberglass, resin, paint, marble 120” x 132” x 132”

Carrying the weight of that realization, you are suddenly thrust out into a large open and airy space dominated by a ten foot Ganesh-blue female human/ram, The Deity, presented as a symbol of hope and recovery. Included in this Hall of the Gods are three panels of icon paintings reminiscent of Byzantine altar triptychs often employed for private devotional use. These images combine traditional Christian postures and palette, but replace the Madonna and Child with the recurring theme of horned animals meant to inspire strength in their power.

Dorota & Steve Coy,  Therianthropic Deity 2, 2020 Acrylic and gold leaf on panel 36.75” x 23.75” x 1.5”

Here the flow is interrupted allowing you to choose your own path. The artists’ choice is to enter a museum set 10,000 years from now featuring elements of debris and a particularly poignant sculpture, Lover of Wisdom, which is comprised of a classical bust wearing a respirator. Here you are faced with the consequences of our current treatment of our shared home, Earth. Living in an American goal-oriented society, is this what we’re shooting for?

Dorota & Steve Coy,  Lover of Wisdom, 2020 Cast concrete 21” x 18.5” x 11”

Heading to the rear of the gallery you enter the final chapter in this tale of humanity. The Hygienic Dress League project, a high-end boutique which offers items like cans of air, food and clean water communicating the scarcity of basic necessities to simply sustain life and their ominous commodification. For the discerning consumer, couture respirators glitter for their buyers. One More Sunny Day is either an image of what’s outside or an homage to what was outside, presented in that 3-paneled configuration where blue sky and fluffy clouds are the objects of our adoration.

Dorota & Steve Coy,  Provisions: AIR, 2020 Mixed Media 10” x 10” x 7.875” (AIR 4.875” x 4.125” x 4.125”)

The sales pitch is complete with Adrian Wong’s octagonal barber shop poles, ubiquitous across Asia, hawking everything from noodle shops, parking lots, one-woman brothels and meat vendors in a kinetic coded language. The motion along with an audible buzzing puts you on edge prompting a swift exit; after you score a cheap pair of flip flops to wear while hanging out in your man-made garden in search of peace.

Adrian Wong,  Hypnagogia (Espadrilles, Flip Flops), 2020 Corian, acrylic, fluorescent tubes, magnetic drive motors, vinyl 42.25” x 13.75” x 7”

Adrian Wong, Tiling Error IV (Dogwood & Danishes), 2019 MDF, enamel, sanded grout 36.5” x 60.5”

Dorota & Steve Coy, Homosapien Vessel (BB2) c.2000-2020, 2020 Stoneware, glaze 6” x 8.5” x 1.5”

Powerful gods and human flaws. Are we at the mercy of the gods, or can we recognize our flaws and correct them by contemplating through formal means and spaces? Are the spirits and the heavens closer than we think, hovering next to us at this very moment? Is there any difference between what we choose to worship as a channel to holy transformation such as the Buddhist 8-spoked wheel, or those we choose to discard like a random pattern stamped on the bottom of a garbage can? After all humanity has discovered and employed for the advancement of our society, does it amount to nothing but fossilized plastic bottles or can we leave a legacy of compassionate, intelligent and courageous change?

A big congratulations to Wasserman Projects for being selected by MEDC + PATRONICITY for the MI Local Biz Covid-19 Support Grant! The Michigan Economic Development Corp will match dollar for dollar all donations raised to support their artists and audiences. They just have nine days to meet their goal so donate now!

https://www.patronicity.com/project/wasserman_projects_exhibition__program_support#!/

 Wasserman Projects is located at 3434 Russell Street #502 in Detroit. Exhibition can now be viewed in person by appointment.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/private-viewing-by-appointment-tickets-108599877156

Popps Packing In Hamtramck, Michigan

Popps Packing Gallery Façade, Hamtramck, MI

All the world’s a gallery in a time of closed doors and shuttered art spaces. So leave it to Hamtramck — Detroit’s microcosm of storied Eastern Europe and Middle East immigration, rustic industry, and old-world charm that embraces punk rock and pierogis with equal relish — to flex its creative chops to inspire, engage and welcome interaction. Gina Reichert and Mitch Cope’s latest project, Ride It Sculpture Park, combines skateboarding and public art. Chido Johnson co-founded the Zimbabwe Cultural Centre of Detroit serving artists by breaking down borders and boundaries. Chris Schneider continues his own practice as well as exhibits some of the best of Detroit at his Hatch Gallery.

Another of the standouts in this inspiring entourage is Graem Whyte and Faina Lerman, co-founders of Popps Packing and Emporium. There’s no shortage of press on this dynamic couple. I could easily provide a bunch of links and you’d get a solid picture of the buildings they’ve purchased and renovated; and the prestigious grants that allowed that to happen. You’d be well versed in their individual achievements as artists, each in their own right. What’s behind all that is their cultural and social contribution to the neighborhood they’ve helped to transform while raising a family under the same umbrella.

Popps Packing Backyard Sculpture Park and Playground

When entering Popps Packing for an exhibition, you’ll likely be greeted by their two dogs. Kids are welcome and are free to tear around the large backyard, inventing games using any of the unusual sculptural structures once elevated and gallery-presented now doubling as playground equipment. A favorite event there is the Pinewood Derby fundraiser. Local artists from all over the Metro area completely ignore all Boy Scout instructions to construct the wackiest, usually unbalanced, excessively heavy and very much, sometimes purposefully, flammable vehicles. These semi-functional contraptions are put to the test in a vigorous racing contest that causes competitors to double up with laughter and feigned agonizing defeat when their car loses to a LED illuminated octopus in a polka dot dress. The party lasts well into the night on beer, grilled cheese and Yuen Hom’s famous rum cakes.

 

Popps Packing Pinewood Derby Compound

 

Popps Packing Pinewood Derby Starting Line

These kind of events draw neighbors as well as artists in a convivial heterogeneous social brew. With a desire to “find space to continue to be fluid with programs that are spontaneous and responsive as opposed to contrived and formalized,” Lerman says. “It’s also walking a fine line between being credible as an art venue and still being a home that welcomes folks in.” While most traditional gallery spaces can present as a bit intimidating to the uninitiated, this easygoing approach welcomes all who are curious.

Popps Packing Exhibition Space

 

Popps Packing Exhibition Space

With the arts ecosystem severely limited right now, these innovators adapted to the current landscape by embracing The Pause to step back and reassess their message and mission going forward, emerging as a stronger, clearly focused arts platform. As a community-based ideal and an awareness that not everyone has access to the internet, they aren’t jumping on the Zoom bandwagon but choosing to stick with their holistic approach focusing on a residency-based infrastructure. It’s also afforded some much needed studio time to reacquaint themselves with their personal art practices that have mostly taken a backseat to the steady exhibition schedule and certainly the business of raising a family.

While we eagerly await new work, Whyte’s Remain Calm installation at the Oakland University Art Gallery returns relevant in our current circumstances. Whyte’s tenet that we must ‘remain calm’ in the face of potential catastrophes says, “I’d like to think we can change the course of history if we really want to, even if it seems impossible.”

Graem Whyte Make Love Not War, modified ping pong tables, wood paneling, aluminum steel, wheels. 6’4”x8’4”x11’

Whyte continues: “Remain Calm was in 2012, and there was a bit of buzz about the Mayan Calendar and the whole ‘the Apocalypse is coming’ thing, and the show was a response to that. There were four main pieces in the show, each one correlating with one of the Horsemen of the Apocalypse, but instead of death and destruction, my approach was to think of transformation. So instead of Death, Famine, Conquest and War, my pieces embodied Rest, Meditation, and Love/Play. Make Love Not War was a sort of ping pong vortex and was a nod to battle, but with the spin of play and positive interaction. I guess the concept of that show relates today as well, as we are all forced to pause and reflect in an uncertain time. And MLNW will be undergoing a transformation of its own in the next couple weeks as it is reworked into a new chicken coop for Popps.”

Popps Packing Compound Live Music

With such a concentration of ingenuity contained in a few square miles, it’s a clear illustration of how energy generated by one inspires another until an entire community is humming with creativity.  Whyte comments, “I’m generally of the opinion that positive thoughts go a long way in determining our futures.” Turn your babushka into a mask, throw on your docs, grab the kiddos and scope out a little hometown live art.

Public Art in Detroit

“There is a connection, hard to explain logically but easy to feel between achievement in public life and progress in the arts.” JFK

Culture is at the heart of any great city; integral to its experience and legacy. Without that, its buildings and streets stand cold, feral. The Detroit Institute of Arts’ world class collection was allowed to remain intact through the city’s bankruptcy and continues to be critical to anchoring a community where people don’t just want to visit, but want to invest, live, work and put down roots. The Heidelberg Project endured its share of scathing criticism, and arson, only to stand today as symbol of our fortitude. Charles McGee’s recent sculpture “United We Stand”, installed outside the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, continues that call to creative arms.

DAR archival image of Charles McGee’s United We Stand

Robert Schefman, Faculty Professor at the College of Creative Studies and an artist of over 40 years experience with public shows, commented, “For centuries, public art has been a responsibility for those who governed, and could afford the funding. In America, theoretically, we are the government, and democracy puts responsibility for public work, with the public. I will assume that there is some agreement on the benefits of placing artwork in public for everyone to enjoy, regardless of their position in society, because the communication of ideas and experiences through artwork of any discipline enrich us all.”

However, he continues, “When we talk about public art, we change how we relate to our spaces. Change is a double edged sword, and the changes are not always desired by current residents, no matter how much it will beautify, or improve an environment. A mural is placed in a space that draws more people into the area, and the look of the area, altering the way the current occupant feels about “their” space. People often fight change.” Case in point is the installation of “Waiting”, a 17-foot bronze sculpture by internationally acclaimed artist KAWS. The piece is sort of a cross between a Disney and an M. Night Shyamalan character. To say it provoked a strong response is an understatement. Whether attracted, repelled, confused by it, most can’t resist taking a selfie with it. It does what art is supposed to do, engage with the viewer.

“Waiting” KAWS, 17’ bronze sculpture, image courtesy of Kim Fay.

Born from a public art project on New York City’s High Line, John Sauvé enlisted students from a local school where arts funding had been cut. Very quietly and with little promotion, a silhouette of an orange man sporting a fedora began appearing on city rooftops. Now known as The Man in the City International Sculpture Project, the on-going installation is comprised of 60 sculptures located on the rooftops throughout the City of Detroit and Windsor. The Man in the City Project creates a metaphor for life that transforms the skyline and encourages people to look around. It’s an ingenious vehicle to highlight this city’s sensational architecture as well as prompt the viewer’s sense of their place within the city. In our increasingly busy lives, our faces habitually planted in our handheld screens, the sudden materialization of a bright figure incongruous with its architectural host gives pause and a moment to remember ourselves and our community.

John Sauvé, The Man in the City Project, courtesy Michigan Radio

Until recently public art traditionally consisted of elegant sculpture arranged in neatly manicured gardens or parks leaving two-dimensional art relegated to gallery and museum walls. Graffiti has been around since Lascaux Cave’s Paleolithic I-was-here paintings. Contemporary inscriptions became ubiquitous on any modern city’s decaying buildings. Rough and raw, quickly written, it was considered an emblem of decline and abandonment. As the global spotlight on Detroit’s ravaged neighborhoods grew brighter, images of that blight were distributed worldwide. What those images failed to convey was our soul. Detroiters know how to grind. Our resilience has been historically expressed through note and rhyme. Today, it’s described in canned brushstrokes, metals and ink. Indigenous graffiti has evolved from a name scrawled under a bridge somewhere into beautifully executed pieces displayed proudly where everyone can see them. Bold and immediately recognizable styles envelop buildings from Eastern Market to the Creative Corridor. As Schefman stated, there is resistance to change. Those first towering blasts of color, although legally commissioned, still carried the old stigma. Is it vandalism or is it art?

Pose, the Belt, Detroit, image Kim Fay

One the highest concentrations of street art in the world is The Belt/Z Garage’s international collaboration of writers. You can’t miss Shepard Fairey’s mural on One Campus Martius. His smaller piece “Pattern of Destruction” is part of the Belt, a culturally redefined alley between Broadway and Library Street showcasing a gauntlet of creative minds including Cleon Peterson, Nina Chanel Abney, Pose, Hoxxoh and our own Tiff Massey. Peterson describes his images of faceless street fighters as “a gray world where law breakers and law enforcers are one in the same; a world where ethics have been abandoned in favor of personal entitlement.” Tiff Massey references African culture in her work and says, “It’s always going to be large. It’s always going to be in your face.”  Their work turns a meal, a couple cocktails and a packed gallery opening into a raucous street fair.

Cleon Peterson, Nina Chanel Abney, the Belt, Detroit, image Kim Fay

Hoxxoh, the Belt, Detroit, image Kim Fay

This genre has gotten such attention Detroit hosts the annual event Murals in the Market organized by 1xRun and located primarily in Eastern Market. The sprawling festival draws artists from all over the world. It includes local writers Malt and Fel3000ft who collaborated on a piece for the festival. I caught up with artist Malt, who has prominent aerosol pieces in the Dequindre Cut, Lincoln Street Art Park as well as a few remaining underground tags from when he started writing in 1994. His style was inspired by skateboard graphics from the 80’s. Strong color, hard black lines. He says, “Graffiti has always been here. People evolved and got better. Everyone’s still doing their thing just on a larger scale.” Public interest has helped him out tremendously. Before it was all out of his own pocket. Now he gets commissions and has gallery representation. “There’s been a huge progression over the last 10 years. It’s rad. People respect it. It attracts more people to the city.” He adds, “I’d rather look at a colorful wall than beige cinder block.” Amen.

Malt-Fel3000ft collaboration 1xRun Murals in the Market, courtesy of the artist

Malt – Dequindre Cut, courtesy of the artist

No more cloak of darkness with a backpack full of cans. This art form is legit. Love it or hate it, the work is stunning, fun and livens up how we look at life. I still have mad respect for an old school tag dangling on a freeway overpass. As with any art form, how’d they do that?

*Malt and Freddy Diaz open their two-person show at M Contemporary tentatively April 17

Angela Glajcar @ K.OSS Contemporary Art

Angela Glajcar, K.OSS Contemporary Art Installation image 2020

K.OSS Contemporary Art presents Angela Glajcar in a solo exhibition titled “My Silence Is My Self Defense.” Glajcar was born in Mainz Germany and studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Nuremberg. She achieved Master Student status and has been the recipient of several prestigious awards. Following her Detroit exhibition at K.OSS, she has a show at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington D.C. this June.

Angela Glajcar, Terforation  Installation detail

K.OSS’s IG promotional images of achromatic abstract paper sculpture caught my attention;  “My Silence Is My Self Defense” sealed my curiosity. The title was taken from a Billy Joel song “And So It Goes” where the lyrics read:

In every heart there is a room
A sanctuary safe and strong
To heal the wounds from lovers past
Until a new one comes along

I spoke to you in cautious tones
You answered me with no pretense
And still I feel I said too much
My silence is my self defense

And every time I’ve held a rose
It seems I only felt the thorns
And so it goes, and so it goes
And so will you soon I suppose

But if my silence made you leave
Then that would be my worst mistake
So I will share this room with you
And you can have this heart to break

And this is why my eyes are closed
It’s just as well for all I’ve seen
And so it goes…

I’ve been intrigued with low- to no-color work as I’ve been following Daniel Arsham for a while. In a welcomed respite to current trends where the viewer is regularly bludgeoned with color, the absence of it makes the work intrinsically calmer. It invites introspection and is instinctively meditative. Glajcar takes us on an other-worldly foray into cloudlike glacial caves of transparency, light, and shadowy layers; ever peering into the soul of an unchartered destination.

Angela Gajcar,  Terforation Installation 50 x 39 x 196″

Successful diatonic work is a feat in itself. It’s a lot like losing one of the five senses forcing you to rely on the remaining four to evaluate your surroundings. An artist requires some serious skills to pull off strong work without the use of color. The piece can’t rely on a shock of red to salvage a mediocre composition. Sculpture affords depth in its naturally occurring dimensions. The viewer has the luxury of physically circumnavigating the piece, interpreting it from every available angle. Representational sculpture allows the viewer to seamlessly connect through an easily recognizable subject. Glajcar has created abstract work that draws the viewer in via mysterious allure. Her expansive installation is particularly compelling in that every person who attended the opening found themselves absorbed in their attempt to discover its secrets by looking through the piece from one end to the other; even placing themselves into the middle of it, determined to force the piece to revelation. We looked again, deeper, closer: each reexamination whispering like a best friend revealing the latest gossip.

Glajcar writes, “I have chosen one of my ”Terforations“ as a “route“, is a way of dealing with space. My work in general is about exploring how space is experienced. “Terforation“ is a term I established by myself. It partly stems from perforation (from the Latin for hole, foramen), that is, the perforation of hollow or flat objects. It also refers to terra, the Latin word for earth. It alludes to the term terra incognita (unknown land; figurative: new land) to indicate that my work is about exploring unknown regions. For terra incognita hints at a vague idea, the supposition of knowledge as yet not clearly definable. The object refusing to be defined more clearly is the shape, the space created by the horizontal layering of sheets of paper with holes in them. To draw the viewer’s attention to this interstice, this void, it is never possible to look straight through the works, because the holes are positioned such that the hollow stretches into the unknown.”

Angela Gajcar,  Terforation,  installation detail

Although the paper material is quite heavy at 300g, it reads exquisitely graceful. The sculpture at once takes and gives space. The hand-torn edges grant detail to the Universal language of exploration; the search for love and sanctuary.

Glajcar writes, “Using paper was somehow the end of a long journey. After working with wood and steel I found out that paper is meeting my particular
requirements perfectly. Initially, paper appears light and fragile. Depending on its quality and layering, however, it can also be heavy and resilient. Since paper is made of natural substances and is therefore perishable like any other natural tissue, it takes up a position halfway between natural and artificial. In contrast to wood or metal it absorbs color and is permeable without being of any color itself. Paper can be processed without any tools – although this requires quite a bit of effort – and can easily be agitated, so that the works that already give the impression of floating begin to sway, casting a moving shadow. For me no other medium is of such a wide range of possibilities.”

Angela Gajcar,  Terforation,  installation detail

The smaller pieces seem to be abbreviations of the larger installation but miraculously hold an element of the same unsolvable mystery. The search for resonance isn’t as deep yet delivers satisfactory vibrations. In our world’s persistent cacophony of jarring frequencies, Glajcar’s work offers a momentary hiatus, allowing the viewer’s breath to relax and return to peace.

Installation by Angela Glajcar is on view at K.OSS Contemporary Art through March 28, 2020

Timothy van Laar @ Simone DeSousa

Timothy van Laar, Installation image, Simone DeSousa Gallery, 2020 All images are courtesy of the Simone DeSousa Gallery

Simone DeSousa Gallery presents Timothy van Laar in a solo exhibition titled Always Sometimes Never. Van Laar is a multi-media artist working primarily in painting, collage, installation and drawing. He has exhibited his work in over 250 solo and group exhibitions in the US and abroad. His work is included in collections such as the Detroit Institute of Arts, The Illinois State Museum, The Minneapolis Institute of Art and Herman Miller. Van Laar is also a distinguished scholar and art critic, co-authoring three books and has written numerous art reviews and catalog essays.

Van Laar’s new paintings are displayed alongside selected works from the 1980’s and the 1990’s. The new pieces originate in the ruptured signs and spaces of collage, referencing various utopian ideas- Eden, comfort, new worlds, prediction. The older works emphasize and give context to the broad, consistent issues of his work and show a long term commitment to paintings that embrace their materiality, rummage through cultural history and merge anxiety with pleasure.

It’s an education to view an artist’s older work in tandem with the newer because it illustrates the creative journey. Van Laar’s earlier work is pure abstract expressionism. Aggressive swirls, dabs and chunks of paint arranged in enough of a composition to keep the paint from dripping off the canvas. Ferociously applied paint using various tools are revealed by their residual marks and strokes. Muddy earth and grey tones lending a melancholy flavor.

Timothy van Laar, Natural History (Blossfeldt) XII, oil and wax on canvas 20×16″ 1996

Timothy van Laar, Natural History (Blossfeldt) VIII, oil and wax on canvas 20×16″ 1996

In the newer pieces, the work is cleaner with their subjects floating in a negative space, bound by palette and theme like electrons in an atom. The same artist’s hand appears in the application of thick paint in a dab and swirl motion, leaving tactile globs that strongly contrast with the blended smooth renderings of their neighboring objects.

I was immediately taken with New World. Identifying the mushroom with its lingering cloud set off mental alarms. I’m pleased that cloud seems to be merely an embarrassing expulsion of nuclear flatulence versus an Armageddon style eruption. Let’s hope we get off that easy. A tender component is an assortment of colored circles occupying the grid. This is an interesting device that not only contributes to the overall composition, it affords a bit of cheer to the narrative. This color scheme phenomenon appears regularly in this artist’s work and has carried through a few conceptual evolutions. An older, smaller work The Book of Landscape, (Ansel Adams), van Laar seems to be inviting the viewer to paint the mountains with these suggested colors as in a paint-by-numbers kit. I liked this work so much it made its debut in my IG feed when it was freshly conceived.

Timothy van Laar, New World, oil on canvas 36×48″ 2019

Timothy van Laar, The Book of Landscape (Ansel Adams), oil on canvas 16×20″ 2017

In Eden, van Laar chose to paint his hummingbird in a loose and expressive manner. Without the benefit of detail, and far from scale size, it effectively communicates this bird’s delicate loveliness. In the upper left corner is the provided color sampler presented in a Matisse cut-out style. A small Escher-like object rounds out the subjects. This is a very calming piece — a pleasure to New World’s anxious tone.

Timothy van Laar, Eden, oil on canvas 36×48″, 2019

In the tech-comm realm where everyone seems to be shouting, this exhibition has as much to say as anyone about our global fears, but van Laar discusses his point of view quietly and beautifully. If you want to get someone’s attention, whisper.

 

Ryan Standfest @ Simone DeSousa – EDITION

Simone DeSousa EDITION presents I went to work but I did not get there, a special feature of new works by Ryan Standfest.

“In my work, unrequited yearning for progress collides with more complex realities in which failure undermines expectation and shifts centers of power in an absurd cycle of hyped aspiration and subsequent deflation. These polarities necessitate social critique with the question of who is allowed to access dreams of fulfillment and what that yields. I return to a very particular convoluted working class inclination toward longing undercut by repulsion: the need for upward mobility combined with a distrust of what that success gains access to.”

Standfest’s exhibition is multi-media including everything from relief prints, paint, tape and a metal lunch box. The craftsmanship is so stellar, it allows the viewer to proceed directly to the message. The humor, as well as the futility, shines through in tightly organized configurations. I appreciate the contrast of clean lines alongside the rough-cut collaged material.

Ryan Standfest, Factory Head No. 5 (TODAY I MADE NOTHING), archival inkjet on Epson 15×15″ framed, 2019 Image courtesy of the artist

Standfest’s cold industrial, almost a chilling Vonnegut Welcome to the Monkey House vibe, is suddenly broken with an old-timey sales pitch that produced an actual LOL from this viewer. FINAL DAYS! EVERYTHING MUST GO! The theme of this show contains both the depressing and the mundane. Current economic circumstances in “NO HELP WANTED” and a familiar “Today I Made Nothing” complete with Standfest’s headgear version of the Monkey House’s heavy collar of obedience and conformity, rendering the subject anonymous. As one who is capable of sitting in my studio ‘working’ when no visible change has been made to any of the pieces, I can spin the apparent inactivity into some kind of philosophical explanation that I’ve been contemplating the palette or the composition or ruminating over my entire concept: How to look busy without actually producing anything.

Ryan Standfest, Ryan Standfest,  Wide shot of the entire installation, 2020

THE WOUND OF THE WORKING CLASS! sits close to the center of the installation, enjoying a splash of pink, the only bright color in an otherwise muted palette. Hope? We don’t need no thought control.

Both van Laar and Standfest employ harsh narratives tempered with moments of sparkling humanity. They both explore current social, environment and economic themes. Muted but bright. Expressive yet controlled. The dichotomy of human existence.

Get ‘em while they’re hot!

Tim van Laar and Ryan Standfest at the Simone DeSousa Gallery runs through Feb 22, 2020